What Happens When You Get a DUI In Connecticut?

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Getting pulled over by the police for drunk driving is a serious offense. Depending on where in the country you are or how many offenses you may have could alter the outcome of the situation.

 

While it is already a frightening situation to find yourself in, you also have to think about hiring a criminal defense attorney in Connecticut to make sure you are properly represented and that no mistakes happened during the initial arrest. If you have found yourself in a situation where you have gotten a DUI in the state of Connecticut, here is what you need to know.

 

The Basics of a DUI in Connecticut

The first thing you need to know about driving a motor vehicle under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or both is that it is a criminal offense according to the Connecticut DUI laws. Driving within the state means you are abiding by Connecticut’s Implied Consent Law. This states that anyone who operates a motor vehicle is providing their consent to a blood alcohol test.

If your blood alcohol concentration, or BAC, is above .08 and are above the age of twenty-one, you are considered legally intoxicated. If you are below the age of twenty-one, your BAC must be below .02.

These tests are also in the form of blood or urine to determine proper alcohol or drug use. If you refuse to participate in any of these forms of tests, there are penalties involved, such as driving suspensions and the use of ignition interlock systems.

 

DUI Penalties in the State of Connecticut

Because it is a criminal offense to drive intoxicated, there are several penalties involved. For a first DUI offense, you will be responsible for:

  1. A financial penalty, or a fine, or anywhere from $500 to $1,000
  2. Potential imprisonment of up to six months or probation with at least 100 hours of community service
  3. A 45-day driving suspension
  4. One year of ignition interlock restriction once the 45-day driving suspension has been lifted and your license has been reinstated

Along with these penalties, you may also have to participate in a victim impact panel program. This is a program that may be required by the courts which teaches the long-term impacts of abusing driving laws due to substance abuse.

With every offense thereafter, the penalties will increase. For a second DUI offense, your penalties will include:

  1. A fine, or anywhere from $1,000 to $4,000
  2. Imprisonment of up to two years with a 120-day minimum mandatory stay regardless of bail or good behavior.
  3. A 45-day license suspension
  4. Three years of ignition interlock restriction once the 45-day driving suspension has been lifted and your license has been reinstated
  5. 100 hours of community service
  6. Complete a mandatory substance abuse treatment program appointed by the court prior to the restoration of your license.

Upon your third DUI offense, your penalties include:

  1. A fine, or anywhere from $2,000 to $8,000.
  2. Imprisonment of up to two years with a 1-year minimum mandatory stay regardless of bail or good behavior.
  3. Permanently revoked driver’s license with a two-year probationary period to potentially have it reinvoked with a new court hearing.
  4. Permanent use of ignition interlock restriction if your driver’s license has been reinstated after the two-year mark.
  5. 100 hours of community service
  6. Complete a mandatory substance abuse treatment program appointed by the court prior to the restoration of your license.

 

Hiring the Right Lawyer

It’s incredibly important when you get a DUI that you hire the right criminal defense attorney to represent you. While there will still be repercussions of your actions, you may have the ability with the right lawyer to have some of your penalties lessened.

 

A good lawyer can help by potentially alleviating you from having your license suspended altogether, and instead could get you set up with an ignition interlock device. With any DUI case, there are many factors involved. 

Talk to a lawyer today if you have found yourself facing DUI charges, whether it is your first, second, or third offense.

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