COVID therapy receives treatment failure warning from Health Canada

0

TORONTO —
Health Canada is alerting health-care providers that a COVID-19 monoclonal antibody therapy treatment may no longer be effective against the new subvariant of Omicron.

The agency reported on Thursday that sotrovimab, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and Vir Biotechnology, “is unlikely to maintain efficacy against the Omicron BA.2 subvariant,” and said that the treatment exhibited “a reduction in activity” against the new subvariant.

However, Health Canada says sotrovimab can still be administered to COVID-19 patients who test positive for the earlier subvariants of Omicron.

“Current data indicates that sotrovimab continues to be effective against the Omicron BA.1 and BA.1.1 subvariants,” the agency said. “Local epidemiology and individual exposure to variants should be taken into consideration before use of sotrovimab.”

Sotrovimab was authorized for emergency used in relation to the pandemic last July for treatment of mild to moderate cases of COVID-19 in adults and adolescents 12 years of age or older who are at a high risk of hospitalization or death.

The alert comes a week after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration pulled its authorization for the therapy due to rising cases of the BA.2 subvariant across the country.

Provincial health authorities have already been pulling or discouraging the treatment, instead recommending Paxlovid or Remdesivir.

The Ontario Science Table recommended against using Sotrovimab on April 1 and Alberta paused the use of the treatment on Wednesday. Saskatchewan also discontinued the use of sotrovimab on April 7 and B.C. only recommends the treatment “as a last-line agent.”

WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU HAVE ABOUT OMICRON?

With the emergence of a new COVID-19 variant of concern, labelled Omicron, CTVNews.ca wants to hear from Canadians with any questions.

Tell us what you’d like to know when it comes to the Omicron COVID-19 variant.

To submit your question, email us at [email protected] with your name, location and question. Your comments may be used in a CTVNews.ca story.

// BEGIN: Facebook clicks on unlike button FB.Event.subscribe("edge.remove", function (response) { Tracking.trackSocial('facebook_unlike_btn_click'); }); };

var plusoneOmnitureTrack = function () { $(function () { Tracking.trackSocial('google_plus_one_btn'); }) } var facebookCallback = null; requiresDependency('https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1&appId=404047912964744', facebookCallback, 'facebook-jssdk'); });

// BEGIN: Facebook clicks on unlike button FB.Event.subscribe("edge.remove", function (response) { Tracking.trackSocial('facebook_unlike_btn_click'); }); };

var plusoneOmnitureTrack = function () { $(function () { Tracking.trackSocial('google_plus_one_btn'); }) } var facebookCallback = null; requiresDependency('https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1&appId=404047912964744', facebookCallback, 'facebook-jssdk'); });

Read original article here

Denial of responsibility! Verve Times is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – [email protected]. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Leave a comment
Hello,